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5 Tips on How to Juggle Schoolwork and Travel

My study abroad experience has certainly been the best experience of my life. For this experience to have been so awesome, I’ve had to find the proper balance between completion of schoolwork and travelling the country.

Studying abroad is definitely not ‘No work, all play.’ The top priority of someone studying abroad is to fulfil their job as a student. Engineering courses in New Zealand take just as much time and effort as universities back at home.

That being said – New Zealand, more than any other country, provides so many incredible travel opportunities. It would be a shame to come here and not experience all of the natural and cultural beauty New Zealand has to offer.

The key to balancing schoolwork with travel is good time management. I’ve put together five handy tips that have helped me through my study abroad experience.

HikingNZ

Hiking In New Zealand

1. Make procrastination your enemy

This tip can be applied in two different ways. First, completing your assignments in a timely manner will save you from that ‘Oh no!’ moment when things are due. It is better to get things done ASAP. That way, when a cool opportunity to travel arises, you do not have to worry about an assignment you waited to do. The second part of this tip is to not procrastinate on travelling. Study abroad is for such a short period of time. If there is a place you want to go to, do it now! Don’t wait for another opportunity because that time may never come.

2. Get into a routine

Proper study habits during the week will give you the freedom to travel on the weekend. Set aside certain blocks of time every day for school work. If this time is used effectively, your schoolwork will seem much less daunting.

3. Go to class!!

This tip may seem so simple, but it is so important. Attending class will save you heaps of time trying to teach the material to yourself. 

4. Prioritise and Organise your travelling

Doing some early research and prioritising the things you really want to do can help in the long run. Organising a trip can prevent you from missing out on something cool along the route or near your final destination. With time being the limiting factor of studying abroad, it is important that you try to avoid backtracking or having to return to a place because you missed something. 

5. Enjoy the moment

Don’t get caught up in thinking about what you ‘could be doing.’ Time abroad will fly by! No matter what you are doing, cherish it. Every experience abroad, whether travelling or as a student, has value.

Bungy Jumping NZ

Bungy Jumping, New Zealand

Following these five tips has given me the best experience in New Zealand. I stay busy during the week with school, but have the time on weekends to explore the country. At the end of my time here, I can walk away with a great education and great memories of New Zealand.

 

Jake

By Jake VossUS Study Abroad Student

Updated 10 days ago

Jake Voss, a student from Michigan, USA, attended the University of Canterbury. He feels that his courses were very engaging and the education he gained in New Zealand will be beneficial to his career.  Jake has always loved the outdoors. Some of his favourite experiences have been ascending Gertrude Saddle in Fiordland National Park, completing the Routeburn Track, jumping off the Nevis Bungee, and a tramp to Mueller Hut in Mount Cook National Park.

*Views expressed are the blogger's own
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